24

When I picture us running
a stubborn hinge postponing closure
we are nearly always below ground 
hiding out in tunnels and bomb shelters, my grandparents’ TV room
The lowest level of a million-story building 
with no elevator.
We kiss against walled corners,
sofa cushions,
intertwine ourselves with the bannister 
We kiss until the stairs creak
until the hum of loose floorboard cautions an arrival
waiting until old steps whimper beneath strange weight

"I wore leggings today
because I ate Chipotle last night
because curves are on the lunch menu
because sometimes my body
just wants to breathe and exhale
and not be held in.

I wore leggings today
to remind my hips
that they are ocean
not a containable thing."
Sarah D. Lawson, “Adventures in Juicy-Thighed Women Wearing Leggings As Pants,” published in Drunk in a Midnight Choir (via bostonpoetryslam)

the-underwater-unicorn:

It’s finally finished! Special thanks to reallybadatlife for letting me paint her. And ethnius, I know you wanted to see this.

my friends make me look good.

23

If the first week of May is a sunny one,
all the magnolia trees on 52nd street flower in quick succession
as if each branch coerced the others into blooming
drag each other whimpering as they open
If the first week of May is a sunny one,
52nd street is shaded with blossoms
blocking sun from the sidewalks
scattering petals over the belly of road
blushing like Spring is a newly-told secret

The third week of May, 
regardless of weather,
all the magnolia trees on 52nd street wilt in quick succession
rot beckons in its contralto
sutures the buds shut like praying hands
corrodes the crisp linen until it droops from the clothesline
sulfurs the scent
buries the gossiping springtime in a blanket of grass

April Twenty Fourth.

scribeyourstory:

Gold Again

“Derweze, also known as the door to Hell, is a 70 meter wide hole in the middle of the Karakum Desert in Turkmenistan. The hole was formed in 1971 when a team of Soviet geologists had their drilling rig collapse when they hit a cavern filled with natural gas. In an attempt to avoid poisonous discharge, they decided to burn it off, thinking that the gas would be depleted in only a few days. Derweze is still burning today.”

There is no science to missing someone.
But there is so much poetry in wondering if your best friend still hears other voices and mistakes them for yours,
laughs a laugh that rings too true to yours,
startles at the sound of it,
as if you are still coiled somewhere inside her voicebox,
springing up when the happy pressure becomes too heavy to contain.

There is no science to missing someone.
But there is so much poetry in wishing your broken body into your best friend’s arms,
in wanting, so desperately, to swallow the hour glass grains,
to court the clock, to hold its hands for hours,
to make the time disappear, to make the time tock to a stop.

Most nights, I fall asleep to the quiet rattle of
Not another morning.
Not another afternoon.
Not another dawn to dusk day.
Without you.
Without you.
Without you.

There is no science to missing someone.
But if I had to call the red fist in my chest Derweze -
I think I could write that poem.

Scientists have studied my heart.
They cannot predict when it will stop burning for you.
Maybe it never will.

Come back and let’s be gold again.

There is no science to missing someone.
But there is poetry in everything I still love about you.
I wonder if I ever won’t -
love you that is.

Most nights,
I pray that the red fist in your chest too is fighting against extinguishing.

Come back and let’s be gold again.

thesylverlining:

unexplained-events:

A Tibetan Monk blesses the deer that gather around him and someone snaps a picture. Upon viewing the picture they notice a rainbow had appeared.

pretty sure this is the happiest picture I’ve seen in a long time

thesylverlining:

unexplained-events:

A Tibetan Monk blesses the deer that gather around him and someone snaps a picture. Upon viewing the picture they notice a rainbow had appeared.

pretty sure this is the happiest picture I’ve seen in a long time

science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 
[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!
The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?
Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.
Read the full article by Ethan Siegel
science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 
[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!
The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?
Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.
Read the full article by Ethan Siegel
science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 
[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!
The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?
Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.
Read the full article by Ethan Siegel
science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 
[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!
The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?
Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.
Read the full article by Ethan Siegel

science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 

[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!

The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?

Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.

Read the full article by Ethan Siegel

kaitrokowski:

cantcontrolthegay:

Kait Rokowski: How to Cure a Feminist

I don’t like my hair or my dress in this video BUT SELF LOVE IS BIGGER THAN VANITY. Just. like, if you don’t know, now you know. 

You’ve always been great, this poem has always been great, you could dye your scalp neon and tattoo it with pictures of Oprah and your hair would still be great.
kaitrokowski:

cantcontrolthegay:

Kait Rokowski: How to Cure a Feminist

I don’t like my hair or my dress in this video BUT SELF LOVE IS BIGGER THAN VANITY. Just. like, if you don’t know, now you know. 

You’ve always been great, this poem has always been great, you could dye your scalp neon and tattoo it with pictures of Oprah and your hair would still be great.
kaitrokowski:

cantcontrolthegay:

Kait Rokowski: How to Cure a Feminist

I don’t like my hair or my dress in this video BUT SELF LOVE IS BIGGER THAN VANITY. Just. like, if you don’t know, now you know. 

You’ve always been great, this poem has always been great, you could dye your scalp neon and tattoo it with pictures of Oprah and your hair would still be great.
kaitrokowski:

cantcontrolthegay:

Kait Rokowski: How to Cure a Feminist

I don’t like my hair or my dress in this video BUT SELF LOVE IS BIGGER THAN VANITY. Just. like, if you don’t know, now you know. 

You’ve always been great, this poem has always been great, you could dye your scalp neon and tattoo it with pictures of Oprah and your hair would still be great.
kaitrokowski:

cantcontrolthegay:

Kait Rokowski: How to Cure a Feminist

I don’t like my hair or my dress in this video BUT SELF LOVE IS BIGGER THAN VANITY. Just. like, if you don’t know, now you know. 

You’ve always been great, this poem has always been great, you could dye your scalp neon and tattoo it with pictures of Oprah and your hair would still be great.
kaitrokowski:

cantcontrolthegay:

Kait Rokowski: How to Cure a Feminist

I don’t like my hair or my dress in this video BUT SELF LOVE IS BIGGER THAN VANITY. Just. like, if you don’t know, now you know. 

You’ve always been great, this poem has always been great, you could dye your scalp neon and tattoo it with pictures of Oprah and your hair would still be great.
kaitrokowski:

cantcontrolthegay:

Kait Rokowski: How to Cure a Feminist

I don’t like my hair or my dress in this video BUT SELF LOVE IS BIGGER THAN VANITY. Just. like, if you don’t know, now you know. 

You’ve always been great, this poem has always been great, you could dye your scalp neon and tattoo it with pictures of Oprah and your hair would still be great.

kaitrokowski:

cantcontrolthegay:

Kait Rokowski: How to Cure a Feminist

I don’t like my hair or my dress in this video BUT SELF LOVE IS BIGGER THAN VANITY. Just. like, if you don’t know, now you know. 

You’ve always been great, this poem has always been great, you could dye your scalp neon and tattoo it with pictures of Oprah and your hair would still be great.

ethiopienne:

consent is…

ethiopienne:

consent is…

feministbatwoman:

detenebrate:

0xymoronic:

shitarianasays:

theeyesinthenight:

the-sonic-screw:

platinumpixels:

volpesvolpes:

unseilie:

sarahvonkrolock:

gaysexagainstawall:

them-days-was-olden-as-fuck:

The spread of the black death.

Poland

Poland, tell us your secret.

Poland is the old new Madagascar. 

If I remember correctly, Poland’s secret is that the jews where being blamed all over europe (as usual) as scapegoats for the black plague. Poland was the only place that accepted Jewish refugees, so pretty much all of them moved there. 
Now, one of the major causes of getting the plague was poor hygiene. This proved very effective for the plague because everyone threw their poop into the streets because there were no sewers, and literally no one bathed because it was against their religion. Unless they were jewish, who actually bathed relatively often. When all the jews moved to Poland, they brought bathing with them, and so the plague had little effect there.
Milan survived by quarantining its city and burning down the house of anyone showing early symptoms, with the entire family inside it. 

I reblogged this tons of times, but the Milan info is new.
Damn Italy, you scary.

Poland: “Hey, feeling a bit down? Have a quick wash! There, you see? All better”
Milan: “Aw, feeling a bit sick are we? BURN MOTHERFUCKER, BURN!!!!!”

Also, this might have something to do with it: from what I understand, O blood type is uncommonly… common in Poland. Something to do with large families in small villages and a LOT of intermarriage. The black plague was caused by a bacterium that produced, in its waste in the human body, wastes that very closely mimic the “B” marker sugars on red blood cells that keep the body from attacking its own immune system. Anyone who has a B blood type had an immune system that was naturally desensitized to the presence of the bacterium, and therefore was more prone to developing the disease. Anyone who had an O type was doubly lucky because the O blood type means the total absence of ANY markers, A or B, meaning that their bodys’ immune system would react quickly and violently against the invaders, while someone with an A may show symptoms and recover more slowly, while someone with B would have just died. Because O is a recessive blood type, it shows in higher numbers when more people who carry the recessive genes marry other people who also carry the recessive gene. Poland, which has a nearly 700 year history of being conquered by or partnering with every other nation in the surrounding area, was primarily an agricultural country, focused around smaller, farming communities where people were legally tied to, and required to work, “their” land, and so historically never “spread” their genes across a large area. The economy was, and had been, unstable for a very long period of time leading up to the plague, the government had been ineffective and had very little reach in comparison to the armies of the other countries around for a very very long time, and so its people largely remained in small communities where multiple generations of cross-familial inbreeding could have allowed for this more recessive gene to show up more frequently. Thus, there could be a higher percentage of O blood types in any region of the country, guaranteeing less spread of the illness and moving slower when it did manage to travel. Combine this with the fact that there were very few large, urban centers where the disease would thrive, and with the above facts, and you’ve got a lovely recipe for avoiding the plague.
Interestingly enough, as a result from the plague, the entirety of Europe now has a higher percentage of people with O blood type than any other region of the world. 

WHY IS THIS ALL SO COOL

When Tumblr teaches you more about the plague than 12 years of school ever did.

Just to throw a nod in, as a medieval historian, this is all credible, and is the leading theory as to the plagues effectiveness at this point. So. Enjoy your new knowledge!

feministbatwoman:

detenebrate:

0xymoronic:

shitarianasays:

theeyesinthenight:

the-sonic-screw:

platinumpixels:

volpesvolpes:

unseilie:

sarahvonkrolock:

gaysexagainstawall:

them-days-was-olden-as-fuck:

The spread of the black death.

Poland

Poland, tell us your secret.

Poland is the old new Madagascar. 

If I remember correctly, Poland’s secret is that the jews where being blamed all over europe (as usual) as scapegoats for the black plague. Poland was the only place that accepted Jewish refugees, so pretty much all of them moved there. 

Now, one of the major causes of getting the plague was poor hygiene. This proved very effective for the plague because everyone threw their poop into the streets because there were no sewers, and literally no one bathed because it was against their religion. Unless they were jewish, who actually bathed relatively often. When all the jews moved to Poland, they brought bathing with them, and so the plague had little effect there.

Milan survived by quarantining its city and burning down the house of anyone showing early symptoms, with the entire family inside it. 

I reblogged this tons of times, but the Milan info is new.

Damn Italy, you scary.

Poland: “Hey, feeling a bit down? Have a quick wash! There, you see? All better”

Milan:Aw, feeling a bit sick are we? BURN MOTHERFUCKER, BURN!!!!!”

Also, this might have something to do with it: from what I understand, O blood type is uncommonly… common in Poland. Something to do with large families in small villages and a LOT of intermarriage. The black plague was caused by a bacterium that produced, in its waste in the human body, wastes that very closely mimic the “B” marker sugars on red blood cells that keep the body from attacking its own immune system. Anyone who has a B blood type had an immune system that was naturally desensitized to the presence of the bacterium, and therefore was more prone to developing the disease. Anyone who had an O type was doubly lucky because the O blood type means the total absence of ANY markers, A or B, meaning that their bodys’ immune system would react quickly and violently against the invaders, while someone with an A may show symptoms and recover more slowly, while someone with B would have just died. Because O is a recessive blood type, it shows in higher numbers when more people who carry the recessive genes marry other people who also carry the recessive gene. Poland, which has a nearly 700 year history of being conquered by or partnering with every other nation in the surrounding area, was primarily an agricultural country, focused around smaller, farming communities where people were legally tied to, and required to work, “their” land, and so historically never “spread” their genes across a large area. The economy was, and had been, unstable for a very long period of time leading up to the plague, the government had been ineffective and had very little reach in comparison to the armies of the other countries around for a very very long time, and so its people largely remained in small communities where multiple generations of cross-familial inbreeding could have allowed for this more recessive gene to show up more frequently. Thus, there could be a higher percentage of O blood types in any region of the country, guaranteeing less spread of the illness and moving slower when it did manage to travel. Combine this with the fact that there were very few large, urban centers where the disease would thrive, and with the above facts, and you’ve got a lovely recipe for avoiding the plague.

Interestingly enough, as a result from the plague, the entirety of Europe now has a higher percentage of people with O blood type than any other region of the world. 

WHY IS THIS ALL SO COOL

When Tumblr teaches you more about the plague than 12 years of school ever did.

Just to throw a nod in, as a medieval historian, this is all credible, and is the leading theory as to the plagues effectiveness at this point. So. Enjoy your new knowledge!



thepianofarm:

Don’t we all. Seen at Powell’s on Burnside. Portland.

What Lot’s Wife Would Have Said (If She Wasn’t A Pillar of Salt)

eating-poetry:

Do you remember when we met
in Gomorrah? When you were still beardless,
and I would oil my hair in the lamp light before seeing
you, when we were young, and blushed with youth
like bruised fruit. Did we care then
what our neighbors did
in the dark?

When our first daughter was born
on the River Jordan, when our second
cracked her pink head from my body
like a promise, did we worry
what our friends might be
doing with their tongues?

What new crevices they found
to lick love into or strange flesh
to push pleasure from, when we
called them Sodomites then,
all we meant by it
was neighbor.

When the angels told us to run
from the city, I went with you,
but even the angels knew
that women always look back.
Let me describe for you, Lot,
what your city looked like burning
since you never turned around to see it.

Sulfur ran its sticky fingers over the skin
of our countrymen. It smelled like burning hair
and rancid eggs. I watched as our friends pulled
chunks of brimstone from their faces. Is any form
of loving this indecent?

Cover your eyes tight,
husband, until you see stars, convince
yourself you are looking at Heaven.

Because any man weak enough to hide his eyes while his neighbors
are punished for the way they love deserves a vengeful god.

I would say these things to you now, Lot,
but an ocean has dried itself on my tongue.
So instead I will stand here, while my body blows itself
grain by grain back over the Land of Canaan.
I will stand here
and I will watch you
run.

By Karen Finneyfrock

naamahdarling:

hauntedsticks:

freckledtrekkie:

becausesometimesdreamsdocometrue:

disney-tasthic:

gastalicious-definition:

disney-tasthic:

globalsoftpirka:

disney-tasthic:

thedisneydifference:

Mulan loved my Mulan pen!

She said, “I love things that have my face on it.”

Wow, Mulan, conceited much ;). Seems like you may have been spending some time with Gaston!

NOOOOOO OOOOOONE
SHOOTS LIKE MULAN

WEARS MEN’S SUITS LIKE MULAN!

THINKS FAST AND KICKS ASS ON A ROOF LIKE MULAN

MULAN: “I USE AVALANCHES IN ALL OF MY BATTLE SCHEMIIIING!”

NOT QUITE A GUY, THAT MULAN!

WHEN I WAS A GIRL I DRANK 3 CUPS OF TEA
EVERY MORNING TO HELP ME GROW STRONG

NOW I’VE GROWN UP I DRINK FIVE CUPS OF TEA
AND I DEFEATED THE KING OF THE HUUUUUUUNS

This is the best thing ever.